Extensions for Value Exchange Activity

The Value Exchange Cards Set contains a booklet with the basic instructions for doing Value Exchange Activity (to create Value Exchange Ledger).

Here we outline additional contexts and actions for exploring Value Exchange, and Value Creation.

 

A. As an Individual

For specific instances when a Value Exchange exploration might be most useful, see the handy Poster.

1.  Familiarise yourself with the Value Exchange Concept.

2.  Identify what Key Decision Moment is your context.

3.  Do Value Exchange Activity with Cards (has booklet with instructions) and Ledger worksheet to develop and compare one or both Employee perspectives: Current and Desired realities.

To set your mindset before starting the activity, we recommend this little ritual:

Say “I have value to contribute” while holding the blue cards.

Say “I have value I seek” while holding the orange cards.

Say “I explore what is valuable to me in this moment of <decision moment from poster>” while pointing to spot on poster.

 

4.  With your own completed Value Exchange Ledgers (Current and/or Desired), compare your Ledgers with an Employer Perspective and see what they have in common and where they differ. It’s your choice about to decide if their needs to be strong alignment, and how much alignment or fit you need.

To discover the Employer Perspective:

    • Ask your Team Lead/Manager to use the cards and define the Employer Perspective (NOT their personal Employee Perspective) of a) the Value IN they would find valuable to receive from employees, and b) the Value OUT they have in their power to give or co-create with employees.
    • Take an Empathetic Perspective (see below) and discern it yourself

5.  With your own completed Value Exchange Ledger (Desired), share with colleagues/collaborators to explain and explore value propositions from different perspectives. Invite colleagues/collaborators to create Value Exchange Ledgers for themselves. Use this knowledge to enrich your working relationships.

6.  Look at your completed Ledger and translate the OUT column value elements into something specific and tangible. Make a Value Creation plan on how you might create or capture that value in your workscape by yourself, and with others. Be sure to assign appropriate measures so you know ‘how much’ will be sufficient to your needs or desires.

7.  Repeat step 6 for IN column.

8. Put the plan somewhere safe. Set an appointment with your self to check-in periodically (2 months?) to see that your choices and actions are aligned to the plan. When necessary, adapt the plan.

 

B. As a Coach or Guidance Counsellor

When working with a person at different points in their workscape, we recommend:

1.  Introduce the Value Exchange Concept.

2.  Identify what Key Decision Moment is the relevant context.

3.  Do Value Exchange Activity with Cards (has booklet with instructions) and Ledger worksheet in a guided exercise (including the ritual above) to explore the concept in context for the person (see more details in A. above); and

4.  With guiding prompts, have person look at their completed Ledger and translate the OUT column value elements into something specific and tangible. Make a Value Creation plan for creating or capturing that value by self, and with others. Be sure to assign appropriate measures for ‘how much’ will be sufficient to needs or desires.

5.  Repeat step 4. for IN column.

6. Put the plan somewhere safe. Set an appointment with your self to check-in periodically (2 months?) to see that your choices and actions are aligned to the plan. When necessary, adapt the plan.

7.  Enable them (using your coaching wisdom) to re-use the Value Exchange Activity in any of the other points in their workscape.

Self unLimited provides coaching sessions for individuals who want a guide in undertaking the Value Exchange Activity for the first time. If you are a Coach or Guidance Counsellor, we can provide this same experience for you, to get a taste of how you might coach others; and answer questions about supporting others in this activity.

 

C. As a Team Lead/Manager

When managing or leading individual staff or team of staff, we recommend:

1.  Introduce the Value Exchange Concept.

2.  Identify what Key Decision Moment is the context.

3.  Do Value Exchange Activity with Cards (has booklet with instructions) and Ledger worksheet for yourself first. This helps you to be clear on what is Value to you as an Employee (and be able to differentiate your own perceptions of Value from what another has); then

4.  Use the Cards yourself to define what is Value from Employer Perspective (see above in A.4) – to be ready to offer this different perspective; then

5.  Do Value Exchange Activity with Cards in a guided exercise (see A. above) with your people to explore the concept in context from their Employee Perspective.

6.  With guiding prompts, have person look at their completed Ledger and translate the OUT column value elements into something specific and tangible. Make a Value Creation plan for creating or capturing that value by self, and with others. Be sure to assign appropriate measures for ‘how much’ will be sufficient to personal needs or desires.

7.  Repeat step 6. for IN column.

8. Put the plan somewhere safe. Set an appointment with your self to check-in periodically (2 months?) to see that your choices and actions are aligned to the plan. When necessary, adapt the plan.

9.  Enable them (using your Team Leader agency) to re-use the Value Exchange Activity and Value Creation Plan in any other points in their workscape; and

10. Enable the team to be literate and speak about Value in all the collaborative activities you do together.

 

There’s a half-day course, if you’d like your whole team to experience the Value Exchange Activity with added content about Value Creation. Contact us to explore this option.

For a Team Lead/Manager, we can provide a single coaching session, for you to get a taste of how to guide a person in doing these activities. We’ll also answer any questions about adjusting the activity for your context.

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D. Discern for others with Empathetic Perspective

Sometimes you won’t have the opportunity to find out what is Value for another person directly. So you’ll need to take an empathetic perspective – that is to listen to what they say, see what they do, and ‘put yourself in their shoes’ to see the world from their perspective.

We know it rationally, but it’s easy to forget: Others don’t see the world as we do, and don’t want the same things we do.

You’ve probably heard of the Golden Rule: Do until others as you would have them do unto you. To take an empathetic perspective, this rule is better: Don’t do until others as you would have them do until you; their tastes are not the same. (George Bernard Shaw)

It takes practice, to listen actively to what another person talks about, to observe what they do, and discern what are their desired Value Elements. ‘Discern’ is the deliberate verb of choice, because people rarely talk explicitly in terms of Value.

Here’s a story to illustrate:

A new project team had started on a project that was already underway. They were responsible for a portion of the overall delivery of the project. They were working with a Project Manager that they didn’t know very well. The Project Manager had been asking for a number of weeks for a Plan of what the team was going to do. The new team were frustrated, as they didn’t have enough information to form a plan as they were still understanding the project and getting the lay of the land. The Project Manager was getting frustrated that his requests for a Plan seemed to be ignored.

I was Mentoring the project team. I ask them what they thought was of value to the Project Manager – to take an empathetic perspective. They struggled to think about it.

So I reframed the question: If PROJECT PLAN was the Answer, what was the Question (from the perspective of the Project Manager)? [This is the Reverse Q&A technique – very simple and very powerful.] They replied: How to know what was being planned?

I asked the team: What might that be in terms of Value for the Project Manager? They came up with various answers, but together we landed on these aspects of value: ORDER, CONTROL, TRUST. I asked the team: How can you deliver Order, Control and Trust without a Project Plan? They put their creative minds in gear and came up with a solution.

This conversation about Value – and not getting caught up in the specifics of “The Plan” – cleared a blockage which reduced stress and made everyone happy because they could get what they wanted.

 

Practice listening for Value in conversations with colleagues, with peers, with customers, with family and friends. It will make you a better practitioner and take you to higher levels of providing service.  When you can provide the Value that another person seeks, then you are truly Valuable to them.